PREVENTING CONCUSSIONS

Making sure you and or your child always wears the right helmet for their activity and that it fits correctly. Wearing a helmet is a must to help reduce the risk of a serious brain injury or skull fracture. However, helmets are not designed to prevent concussions. There is no “concussion-proof” helmet.

SAFETY TIPS TO FOLLOW TO AVOID INJURY


Wearing Helmets

Buy and use helmets or protective head gear approved by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) for specific sports 100 percent of the time. The ASTM has vigorous standards for testing helmets for many sports; helmets approved by the ASTM bear a sticker stating this. Helmets and headgear come in many sizes and styles for many sports, and must properly fit to provide maximum protection against head injuries. In addition to other safety apparel or gear, helmets or headgear should be worn at all times for:
  • Baseball and softball
  • Cycling
  • Football
  • Hockey
  • Horseback riding
  • Powered recreational vehicles
  • Skateboards/scooters
  • Skiing
  • Wrestling

Head gear is recommended by many sports safety experts for:
  • Martial arts
  • Pole vaulting
  • Soccer

Sport Tips

  • Supervise younger children at all times, and do not let them use sporting equipment or play sports unsuitable for their age.
  • Do not dive in water less than nine feet deep or in above-ground pools.
  • Follow all rules at water parks and swimming pools.
  • Wear appropriate clothing for the sport.
  • Do not wear any clothing that can interfere with vision.
  • Do not participate in sports when ill or very tired.
  • Obey all traffic signals, and be aware of drivers when cycling or skateboarding.
  • Avoid uneven or unpaved surfaces when cycling or skateboarding.
  • Perform regular safety checks of sports fields, playgrounds and equipment.
  • Discard and replace sporting equipment or protective gear that is damaged.

General Tips

  • Wear a seat belt every time, whether driving or riding in a motor vehicle.
  • Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or ride as a passenger with anybody else who is under the influence.
  • Keep unloaded firearms in a locked cabinet or safe, and store ammunition in a separate, secure location.
  • Remove hazards in the home that may contribute to falls. Secure rugs and loose electrical cords, put away toys, use safety gates and install window guards. Install grab bars and handrails if frail or elderly.